Posted in Blog Posts

Reworking a draft: when do you just have to let it go?

Everyone knows nothing’s perfect after the first draft.

But how many drafts are you supposed to write? Where is that fine line between honing a work and polishing a turd? When do you accept something as a failure–nay, a learning experience?

I think the answer is when it is holding you back.

Perhaps you’re too focused on that one piece that you’re neglecting to think of others. What you imagined was your opus is now your albatross. Something a colleague once said to me in the editing room, “You just have to let it go, man.”

Let it go.*

Sounds easy, sure. But, wow. It’s not.

Continue reading “Reworking a draft: when do you just have to let it go?”

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Flash fiction: the mastery (or tyranny?) of form

Flash fiction is a form with such tightly controlled standards that – for me – attempting it is like joining the marines. And I just don’t have what it takes. My usual authorial endeavours are a bit too akin to guerrilla warfare for me to stray too often onto the open battlefield that is the flash fiction market.

Yes, all stories need a beginning, middle, and end. You need to introduce a character, set up their arc, and then watch them complete it. But somewhere along the way, the structure of flash fiction has narrowed to include that little twist at the end: a bow that ties it all together. But when you are required to telegraph your intent so clearly, how do you hide the seams that show where you stitched this all together? Continue reading “Flash fiction: the mastery (or tyranny?) of form”

Interview with Polygon for ‘Archie out of Context’

Yes, oh, yes. We all have “side hustles.” There’s a strange implication in that phrase that distinguishes it from “hobby.” And Archie Out of Context is a tad too strange to pass for a hobby. It’s a bit more of an afterthought, really. Certainly not someone I put any work into. But alas. Only seems fitting that it should be so wildly popular.

Read the interview here.